Events

Archive 2005 Spring

LL&C Colloquium Series presents LL&C alumnus Laura J. Gurak, Digital Communication and Rhetorical Studies: What's Next?

Gurak notes, "My presentation will be an opportunity to return to the place where I discovered rhetoric, technical communication, and Internet research, and literally look backward and then forward. I will use by way of example the University of Minnesota's UThink blog project and the research it has inspired me to undertake blog.lib.umn.edu. In addition to discussing the digital side, I hope to address the rhetorical as well. How has rhetorical theory kept up with Internet research? Has the nexus been fruitful to both sides of the equation?"

Reception immediately follows.

See the attachment below for more information.


Laura J. Gurak is Professor and Department Head in the Scientific and Technical CommuEvent Details
The McKinney Competition recognizes students who demonstrate talent in various genres of writing.

The Department of Language, Literature, and Communication invites you to submit entries in the following categories (undergraduate or graduate):
- Poetry
- Essay
- Fiction or Drama
- Electronic Media

Entries are due by 4:00 p.m., Friday, March 25, 2005 in Sage 4702.

Visit the McKinney website (listed below) for an entry form and submission details.Event Details
LL&C Colloquium Series presents a talk by Virginia Martin, Ph.D. candidate.

"You Can't Weave Cloth with Bayonets"
But the Fabric of Community Can Be Had for a Song:
Singing's Critical Role in the 1912 Lawrence Textile Strike

Martin notes, "My dissertation research is a rhetorical analysis of the role played by protest songs in the building of community that occurred in the IWW-led Lawrence Textile Strike of 1912. Mill workers, who comprised dozens of ethnicities, spoke more than 40 dialects, and had a long internal history of bitter antagonism, astonished observers with their show of solidarity. This talk will discuss how their sense of community was induced in no small way by the suasory effects of the songs' narratives and by communal singing's psychagogic (aesthetic and physiological) properties."

Reception, with hot refreshments, immediately follows.

See the attachment below for more information.Event Details
LL&C Colloquium Series presents a talk by Binod Sundararajan, Ph.D. candidate.

"Study of Small Group Decision-Making in CSCL Environments using Social Network Analysis"

Sundararajan notes, "This talk is a prospective look at my dissertation research, including hypotheses, models, data collection and analysis procedures. The study will involve the investigation of small group decision-making processes in computer-supported collaborative learning environments, based on communication artifacts, quality and quantity of student participation and their social presence in class groups. Several methodologies will be integrated, including social network analysis tools to analyze relational data and the social dynamic factors prevalent in group interactions and map emergent student group communication patterns in these environments; content analysis of transcripts of the communication logs; and statistical procedures to analyze attribute data. I will also consider future directionsEvent Details
Michael C. Keith, Ph.D., will be the guest speaker for the 64th annual McKinney Competition.

Thursday, April 28, 2005
Afternoon Seminar
4:00 - 5:00 pm
Sage 4101

Evening Reading, "The Next Better Place"
7:30 - 9:00 pm
DCC 318

Contest winners will be honored at the 7:30 - 9:00 pm reading.


The McKinney Competition recognizes students who demonstrate talent in various genres of writing -- poetry, essay, fiction and drama, and electronic media.

For more information on the McKinney Competition, visit:
www.llc.rpi.edu/web/mckinney


Michael C. Keith is the author of a number of books on the subject of broadcast media -- radio in particular. A senior lecturer of communication at Boston College, his books include Voices in the Purple Haze, Sounds in the DarkEvent Details